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See Under the Sea & in the Swimming Pool Too

Wear goggles for clear & healthy underwater vision

You don’t swim naked at a public beach or swimming pool, and you shouldn’t swim with naked eyes either! At the beach, it’s hard to know if ocean water is really clean and not polluted, and the sand and salt content can make your eyes sting. If you prefer swimming in a pool, remember that while pool water can be clean, that’s only because it’s packed with chlorine, which can seriously irritate your eyes, stripping away your lubricating film and causing redness, pain, and blurry vision.

Goggles are the ideal solution for protecting your delicate eyes against the harshness of water. Also, due to advanced materials and modern engineering of the lenses in swim goggles, they provide crisper underwater vision than ever before! Your knowledgeable Oak Brook eye doctor explains about the benefits and features of goggles:

Prescription goggles

If you normally need eyeglasses or contacts to see above water, our Oak Brook optometrist strongly recommends buying a pair of prescription goggles for underwater vision. For you to see, light rays reflect off an object, enter your eyes, and are focused on your retina clearly. However, light rays don’t function the same way when they are in water. That’s why the floor of a swimming pool appears higher up than it really is. In general, goggles correct this problem by creating an air-filled gap around your eyes. But this doesn’t give sharp sight to swimmers who need vision correction. If you have nearsightedness, farsightedness, or astigmatism, you’ll need prescription goggles to see.

Wearing contact lenses and standard goggles

A lot of people are in the habit of wearing standard goggles over their contact lenses, instead of purchasing a pair of prescription goggles. What’s the problem with this? Actually, water is the problem.

Water in all bodies – lakes, pools, oceans, and hot tubs – is a natural breeding ground for bacteria and microorganisms. While your body and your eyes have a built-in defense system to protect against these menacing microbes, contact lenses interfere with your eye’s protection. Consequently, swimming with contact lenses increases your risk of getting an eye infection.

Acanthamoeba keratitis is an extremely hazardous eye infection caused by amoeba being trapped between your contact lens and your cornea. Sometimes, amoeba start to live in your eye, leading to corneal ulcers and permanent vision loss. This type of infection only happens to people who wear contact lenses, which underscores our Oak Brook eye doctor’s warning against swimming with contacts!

Now, we also realize that many people will insist on wearing contact lenses at the beach or pool – despite all of our warnings. If you’re one of those people, here are some tips to help you minimize the danger to your eye health:

  • Wear daily disposable contacts for swimming, since you throw them out after a single use. Remove them immediately after you come out of the water, rinse your eyes with artificial tears and replace your lenses with a new, clean pair.
  • Even if you’re didn’t fully dip into the water, if any drops fall into your eyes, remove your contacts immediately and throw them out, or disinfect them if you aren’t wearing disposables.
  • Never open your eyes underwater
  • Never go swimming and then doze off on the shore or poolside with your lenses still in your eyes

Top features for goggles – recommended by our Oak Brook optometrist

  • Prescription lenses, if you generally need eyewear with vision correction
  • Shatterproof lenses
  • Anti-fog treatment
  • Leak-free lenses that seal comfortably around your eyes
  • Built-in UV protection
  • Surfers should wear polarized lenses to protect against reflected glare, which can be very intense on the water
  • Competitive swimmers and divers should choose frames with a low profile
  • Recreational lap swimmers do best with larger lenses (they give wider peripheral vision), and more padded frames

More questions about swimming and vision? Ask our Oak Brook eye doctor!

Before you dive into the blue, sparkling waters at the beach or swimming pool, consult with an expert optometrist near you. We’ll help you find the safest way to have sharp underwater vision and a fabulous look! If you do experience irritated eyes, strange discharge, pain, sensitivity or redness after wearing your contact lenses while swimming, contact us immediately for an eye exam at Oakbrook Optical Eyecare.

Help! My Child Doesn’t Want to Wear Glasses!

Do your kids need glasses in order to see clearly? Maybe they have a strong case of nearsightedness, perhaps they have astigmatism, or another type of refractive error. Whatever the cause, getting your kids to wear eyeglasses can be a parenting challenge.

Dr. Joseph Franceschini treats patients from all over Oak Brook, Illinois with their vision correction needs. The knowledgeable, caring staff at Oakbrook Optical Eyecare can help you and your kids if they’re struggling with their glasses or don’t want to wear them.

Why Won’t My Child Wear His or Her Glasses?

To help your children get the best vision possible, you first need to understand why they’re fighting with you over their glasses. It usually stems from something physical, emotional, or social, such as:

  • Wrong fit
  • Wrong prescription
  • Personal style
  • Reactions from friends

How do you know which it is? Pay close attention to the signs, from what your kids say, to how they behave, to how they interact with others.

Physical

Improper fit is a big reason why glasses could feel uncomfortable. If they slip down, itch behind the ears, or put pressure on the bridge of the nose, it can explain why a child wouldn’t like to wear them.

If there’s been a big change to their prescription, they may need time to get used to it. If they were given the wrong prescription, they may be straining their eyes, getting headaches, or having eye fatigue. An incorrect prescription can make wearing glasses painful or awkward. It doesn’t correct their vision, either, so they’ll still see blurry images. When this happens, your eye doctor can check the prescription and make an adjustment.

Emotional

Your kids at home aren’t the same as your kids in school, on the sports field, or with their friends. They may be afraid of being made fun of in school, or they may not want the sudden attention on their appearance. These feelings can be even stronger among the tween and teen set.

Social

Even young kids can feel different when they put on a pair of glasses, especially if it’s for the first time. Feeling different or weird, in their eyes, translates to a negative experience. When wearing glasses makes them feel like the odd man out, they may not want to wear them. The last thing your child wants is to feel like a social outcast. After all, everyone wants to belong.

How We Can Help

First, bring your child in to the eye doctor for an eye exam. Our optometrist, Dr. Joseph Franceschini, will check to make sure that your child has the right prescription and that any vision problems are being corrected. Next, we’ll take a look at the glasses and place them on your child’s face to determine if they’ve got the proper fit. Our optician will take care of any adjustments that need to be made.

The Vision They Need, The Style They Want

Fashion isn’t only for adults. Your budding fashionista or trendy young stud wants to look awesome, so don’t forget about style. When your kids look great, they’ll feel great! Give them the top-quality eyewear they need without compromising on style. Your kids are a lot more likely to wear glasses when they like the way they look.

What You Can Do to Help

Encourage, stay positive, and don’t give up. Avoid telling them what you want them to wear. Let them choose for themselves. In the end, they’re the ones wearing the glasses. Making decisions is an important life skill, something they’ll need as they grow up and become more independent.

For younger children, use positive words to encourage them. Talk about how glasses are like magic, letting them see beautiful things around them. Show them how a pretty flower or a bright red truck looks with the glasses on, and how different it looks with the glasses off. For older kids, throw in a little pop culture. Tell them how trendy they’ll look by showing them pictures of celebrities who also wear glasses. You’ll also rack up some cool parent points.

At Oakbrook Optical Eyecare, we have the experience and unique approach to children’s eyewear that will make your kids want to wear their glasses. Schedule an eye exam today – you can book an appointment online right here. If you have any questions or concerns, give us a call and we’ll be glad to help.

COMPREHENSIVE EYE EXAMS

As your eyes gradually change, so can your vision and prescription needs. That’s why regular eye exams are so important.

As your eyes gradually change, so can your vision and prescription needs. That’s why regular eye exams are so important.

Expert Eye Care in Oak Brook, IL

REQUEST AN APPOINTMENT TODAY!

Your eyes change over time.
This happens as a result of the natural aging process and things like climate, hormones, pregnancy, medications, and the daily activities you enjoy doing. Visiting your family doctor for an annual physical is critical to managing your health. Doing the same for your eyes is just as–if not more–important for maintaining excellent vision and quality of life.

If you’re thinking, “How can I schedule an eye exam near me?”, then contact our office today. We’ll set an appointment at a time that’s convenient for you.

optometrist, green woman eye in Oak Brook, Illinois

What Is a Comprehensive Eye Exam?

Unlike a basic eye check-up, a comprehensive eye exam involves a thorough, detailed examination of your eyes and visual abilities. During the exam, Dr. Joseph Franceschini will ask you about your medical history, family history of any diseases or health issues, medications you may be currently taking, hospital visits, and your personal lifestyle. All of these are elements that can affect your vision.

The comprehensive eye exam includes a number of tests to assess your overall eye health. At Oakbrook Optical Eyecare in Oak Brook, Illinois , we have the top-of-the-line medical equipment and cutting-edge technologies that enable us to provide you with the best quality of care that you and your family deserve.

An essential part of any comprehensive eye exam is a refraction test, or as it is more commonly called, a basic vision or eye test. This gives the doctor an idea of what kind of prescription you may need. The refraction test is simple: the patient looks through a special device called a Phoropter, focusing towards an eye chart, which is usually about 20 feet away from the chair. Dr. Joseph Franceschini will test different lenses to see which ones give you the clearest, sharpest vision.

Based on your specific case, the doctor may perform any of the following tests:

arrow-circle-right-3 arrow-circle-right-3 Visual Field Test

Your visual field is the area that you see while looking at a specific object. For example, when you look at a car, your eyes are focused on it, but you may also see things that surround the car, such as flowers on the ground or rain falling on the windshield. A visual field test examines your ability to see what is in this direct area. Certain eye conditions or neurological disorders can negatively impact your visual field, which is why this test is an essential part of a comprehensive eye exam.

arrow-circle-right-3 arrow-circle-right-3 Binocular Vision Assessment

Similar to how binoculars allow you to use both eyes simultaneously when looking at something far away, binocular vision is the ability of your left and right eye to focus on an image or object so that your brain “translates” the image into understanding what you’re seeing. At its basic level, binocular vision means how the eyes work together as a team.

arrow-circle-right-3 arrow-circle-right-3 Digital Retinal Imaging

Digital retinal imaging technology allows the doctor to check the health of your retina. The image is captured from a special digital camera. The camera takes a photo of the retina, which is located in the back of the eye, and stores the image electronically. This is crucial to your vision needs because the retina helps focus light that enters your eye and sends images to the brain, so that you can ultimately understand the things you see.

arrow-circle-right-3 arrow-circle-right-3 Color Evaluation

A color evaluation tests the ability to differentiate between colors. It is usually done with Ishihara color plates, a series of round circles with colored dots inside that form a number. The patient studies the image, either on paper or on a computer screen, and determines if they can clearly see the number.  This is an important test because difficulty distinguishing between red and green often is a sign of color blindness.

arrow-circle-right-3 arrow-circle-right-3 Corneal Mapping

Corneal Mapping is a process involving the measurement of the cornea. {DoctorName} will use a computerized system and/or a keratometer to collect exact details about the size and shape of your cornea. This is done to ensure that the curvature and size is correct, which allows light to enter your eye so that you can focus on images and see clearly.

arrow-circle-right-3 arrow-circle-right-3 OPTOS Retinal Exam

OPTOS retinal imaging is developed by Optos, a UK-based retinal imaging company. The OPTOS Retinal Exam is now available at {PracticeName} and is unique in providing a wide range image of the retina. This wide imaging has significantly more detail than traditional eye scans, which can allow the doctor to identify and diagnose retinal problems which may be affecting your vision.

arrow-circle-right-3 arrow-circle-right-3 Eye Pressure Test

A tonometry test, more commonly referred to as an eye pressure test, checks the amount of intraocular pressure (IOP) in your eye. Because a high level of pressure can be a sign of Glaucoma, the eye pressure test is an essential part of any comprehensive eye exam. This test involves eye drops which numb the eye, followed by a small device that the doctor uses to gently touch the eye, checking pressure levels.

arrow-circle-right-3 arrow-circle-right-3 OCT Scan

Similar to a traditional CT scan, an OCT Scan (Optical Coherence Tomography) checks for eye diseases by examining the layers of your retina and optic nerve. This test involves the use of a laser with light to provide the doctor with detailed, colored images of the retina. There is no radiation and the test is painless and non-invasive.

arrow-circle-right-3 arrow-circle-right-3 Visual Acuity Test

Visual Acuity is the ability to see clear, sharp images from various distances. To test this skill, the doctor will instruct you to look at an eye chart in various types of bright lighting. The smallest letters or numbers that you can clearly see determines your level of visual acuity.

arrow-circle-right-3 arrow-circle-right-3 Peripheral Vision Assessment

Peripheral Vision is the ability to see what is to the side without moving your head. While your eyes may be focused on an image or object, you can still see things around that focal point. The doctor performs this assessment by instructing you to focus on something directly in front of you, such as a pen. Then you’ll be asked what you can see to the side or slightly away from that object. This test can determine if there is any loss of peripheral vision, which can indicate a number of eye diseases, such as Glaucoma, Diabetic Retinopathy, or Retinitis Pigmentosa.

 

arrow-circle-right-3 arrow-circle-right-3 Refraction Exam

A refraction exam is considered a basic part of an eye and vision evaluation. Refraction is how you see things around you. When there is an imperfection in the refraction of your eye, it causes blurry vision. The 2 main vision problems from refractive issues are nearsightedness and farsightedness. The doctor may conduct this simple test by shining a light into your eyes to check how the light bends through it, or a computerized test may also be used.

How Long Does a Comprehensive Eye Exam Take?

Due to the meticulous detail taken for your eye care, a comprehensive eye exam can take up to one hour. It’s a complete workup of your visual health, so that Dr. Joseph Franceschini can make sure your vision is at its best, helping you enjoy life to the fullest.

No two patients are alike. Should the doctor discover any eye conditions that need treatment, we will create a customized treatment plan for your particular needs.

eye exam, children eye exam in Oak Brook, Illinois

Children's Eye Exams in Oak Brook

Because our young patients grow so quickly, their vision is vastly different than adults. Toddlers, school-age children, and adolescents each have their own needs at these various stages of life, so it’s crucial to have their eyes thoroughly examined on a regular basis. Education experts say that 80% of learning is visual. In fact, many issues related to learning and extracurricular activities can be eye-related.

Difficulty concentrating or acting fidgety can often be misdiagnosed as ADHD when in reality, the child has developed vision problems. Symptoms can include headaches, tiredness from schoolwork or playing sports, or excessive squinting at the board. Children develop rapidly, especially in the early childhood years. This is why doctors recommend regular exams to check how their vision is advancing and to detect any potential problems. The American Optometric Association (AOA) recommends regular eye exams at age 6 months, 3 years, when a child begins school, and every 2 years after that.